September 21, 2009

All About Lobster Eggs

All About Lobster Eggs

Have you ever heard of a food called caviar? If you have, then you probably either love it or hate it. If you have not, you are in for a little bit of education regarding this topic. Caviar is a fancy term for eggs that are edible and come from specific kinds of fish. This product is called roe, and is considered a delicacy in many parts of the word. Did you know that lobsters have roe too? Believe it or not, they do. One thing that may be hard to believe about lobster eggs is that they are also considered a delicacy in many parts of the world – and are just one of the many great things about this delicious crustacean. This article will tell you all you will ever need to know about lobster eggs and how they are used today.

Random Facts About Lobster Eggs

One of the coolest bits of information about lobster eggs is how they exist in the natural world. A female lobster, at any given time, can carry anywhere from 3,000 to over 100,000 eggs – a tremendous amount compared to a lot of other creatures on earth. Only around 2 lobsters will make it out of every 50,000 eggs, though. Another cool fact is that an individual egg laid by a lobster is extremely small – only around the size of a pin! That is a tiny, tiny egg.

As you can see, the information about lobster eggs given above gives you a bit more insight into what they are like when they are eaten as food. Lobster eggs are harvested year-round and are used for food. They are not, however, an everyday item or staple food for most of the people in the world. This is because caviar of any kind is generally quite expensive. Lobster eggs, however, tend to be a little cheaper. You can get a pound of lobster eggs for around $25.00 in many places. When compared to the cheapest kind of caviar – around $20 dollars an ounce – lobster eggs are a pretty good deal.

About Lobster Eggs as Food

One of the things people wonder about lobster eggs is how they taste. People generally recoil in disgust when they think about eating eggs from seafood, but believe it or not, lobster eggs are actually quite tasty. People have described the taste as being somewhat sweet with an almost-fluid texture that results in the eggs melting in your mouth. Some people even think that a perfectly cooked dish of lobster roe is actually better than caviar – and considering caviar is widely considered the premiere delicacy, that is quite a statement!

There are several ways you can prepare lobster eggs. Most people lightly poach them by cooking them in a pan over low heat with butter. Be careful not to scramble them, though. You can also spread them on bread. I recommend focaccia bread, but garlic bread is also a good compliment. You can even put prepared lobster roe on ritz crackers to serve as hors d’ouerves at a party.

Learning about lobster eggs could very well result in a new and extremely tasty dish for you and your guests. Now all that is left to do is go out and grab some roe for yourself – and make your next meal all about lobster eggs!

You are welcome to read :

How To Cook A Lobster- About Frozen Lobster Tails

How To Cook A Lobster-A Great Grilled Lobster Tail Recipe

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September 9, 2009

Five More Amazing Lobster Facts

Five More Amazing Lobster Facts

Lobsters are intriguing creatures all over the world, not just because of their delicious taste. They are interesting because they live in the depths of the ocean and yet are a common, everyday part of our lives and diets.

Five Amazing Lobster Facts #1: Changing Clothes

A lobster has what we call an exoskeleton, which is an outer skeletal structure that supports the rest of the body. Humans have endoskeletons, by contrast. Thus, you may wonder how they grow if they are surrounded by a hard shell. Well, lobsters grow just like any other animal – and they shed, or molt, their shells to match their new bodies. In this way, they are just like snakes and other animals that molt.

Five Amazing Lobster Facts #2: Elderly Lobsters

We humans may be experiencing longer lives in this modern day and age, but there are plenty of animals and other living things on this planet that outlast us. Sequoia trees and galapagos turtles are two prominent examples. Would you believe lobsters are a third? It’s true. Lobsters, if left alone and not captured, fished, etc., lobsters can almost live indefinitely. In fact, some lobsters have been captured that have been measured at over 100 years old. That is far longer than 99% of the human race!

Five Amazing Lobster Facts #3: Lobsters as Health Food

People often extol the virtues of eating shellfish and fish, but many people do not particularly think of lobsters when they think of health food. But, you would be surprised at just how healthy lobster is. When compared to a similar serving of chicken and turkey, lobster had less calories, less cholesterol, and less saturated fat than either. This means that lobster, as a whole, is a healthier meat to consume than either chicken or turkey – which are healthy meats in their own right.

Five Amazing Lobster Facts #4: Humans and Lobsters- Cousins?

Well, while we are not exactly cousins, humans and lobsters are in the same kingdom– the animal kingdom that is. This is where the similarities end, however. Lobsters are arthrpods, which means they have segmented bodies, exoskeletons, jointed appendages, and are invertebrates. They are also crustaceans, who all have shells that must be molted off and shed in order to grow. In this way, lobsters are actually cousins of crabs, shrimp, prawns, and crawfish. Not all crustaceans live in water, though. Some, like certain types of crab, actually live on land. (The lobster, however, does not; it will only live about a day out of water).

Five Amazing Lobster Facts #5: Size Does Matter

Of all the types of lobster in the world, the largest is the American lobster, commonly known as the Maine lobster because Maine is the lobster capital of North America. Most lobsters that you eat average a weight of one to three pounds, but the largest lobster ever caught weighed over 40 pounds and was over three feet long! That is a massive lobster. Think of its sheer size the next time you have a lobster on your plate, and imagine how it would be to have to eat one of those. Just make sure you bring lots of butter!

The five amazing lobster facts above hopefully whet your appetite and made you crave lobster of your own. I know I’m craving lobster right now. What are you waiting for? Plan for a lobster dinner today and satisfy your cravings!

Read First Five Amazing Lobster Facts

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August 27, 2009

Five Amazing Lobster Facts

Five Amazing Lobster Facts

If you are a fan of seafood (and who isn’t?), then you undoubtedly have come across lobster at some point. While not everyone likes seafood, and while not every fan of seafood enjoys lobster, plenty of people across the world adore the savory taste of a freshly-grilled lobster. But the fascination is not just with lobsters as food; it also involves the creature itself. As you will find with these five amazing lobster facts below, lobsters are fascinating creatures that inhabit the depths of the ocean and appear on our dinner plate. The five amazing lobster facts I will share with you in this article may very well give you a newfound appreciation for this intriguing crustacean.

Five Amazing Lobster Facts #1: Lobster Locomotion

We picture any creature that lives in the ocean as like a fish – swimming happily and merrily through the water. A lobster does not swim, though. It instead crawls on the surface of the ocean at a slow pace. And when it is frightened, it escapes by swimming backwards at speeds of around 11 mph. That is a fast lobster!

Five Amazing Lobster Facts #2: Claws or No Claws?

Contrary to popular belief, not all lobsters have claws. Sure, the most popular image of a lobster is a mean-looking thing with large, snapping claws, but some species lack them. These lobsters are commonly known as spiny lobsters, and have spiny shells with no claws. These lobsters, also known as rock lobsters, are grown in warm-water areas like the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea and are also quite tasty.

Five Amazing Lobster Facts #3: Lobster Limbs

Did you know that lobsters can regrow their limbs? This is true. Like starfish, if a lobster loses a limb – be it a claw or a leg – it can actually regrow the missing limb, as good as new. It can even escape from a predator by losing a limb, only to regenerate it later. The antennae is another body part that can be regrown if needed by the lobster, with no apparent difficulty or pain involved.

Five Amazing Lobster Facts #4: Lobsters Have Hands…Kind Of

You as a human more than likely have a dominant hand. You are either right-handed or left-handed (or possibly ambidextrous). Lobsters have handedness too. The larger claw of the two, called the crusher claw, can be either on the right side of the body or the left side of the body, depending on the lobster.

Five Amazing Lobster Facts #5: A Big Lobster Meal

Of all the types of lobster in the world, the largest is the American lobster, commonly known as the Maine lobster because Maine is the lobster capital of North America. Most lobsters that you eat  average a weight of one to three pounds, but the largest lobster ever caught weighed over 40 pounds and was over three feet long! That is a massive lobster. Think of its sheer size the next time you have a lobster on your plate, and imagine how it would be to have to eat one of those. Just make sure you bring lots of butter!

The five amazing lobster facts above hopefully whet your appetite and made you crave lobster of your own. I know I’m craving lobster right now. What are you waiting for? Plan for a lobster dinner today and satisfy your cravings!

Read Five More Amazing Lobster Facts

 

 

 

 

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August 23, 2009

All About the Female Lobster

All About The Female Lobster

Many people are interested in learning more about the female lobster. Rumor has it that these lobsters are a bit sweeter in taste and therefore may be a hot commodity not only in the lobster arena but also in the restaurant business. However, this myth has yet to be proven by experts. Regardless of their specific taste in the kitchen, there are multiple need-to-know facts about the female lobster. Therefore, throughout the remainder of this article we will explore the top five facts about the female lobster that everyone should know.

About the female lobster: Fact #1

This first fact aims at assisting with distinguishing the female lobster from the male lobster. One key way to distinguish the sex of the lobster is by examination of their swimmerets. The first pair of swimmerets on the male lobster appears to be hard, while they are soft on female lobsters. Furthermore, female lobster tails are frequently a bit broader and flatter than those of male lobsters. However, this does not mean they contain more meat.

About the female lobster: Fact #2

Many people enjoy eating roe, which is also known as lobster caviar (lobster eggs). Obviously roe is only found within female lobsters, but are not present in males. This is the only known culinary difference between male and female lobsters that would make a customer prefer one to the other. (Unless of course they fall for the sweetness myth examined above!)

About the female lobster: Fact #3

Female lobsters tend to produce around ten thousand eggs when fertile. These eggs are actually housed under the tail of the female lobster. Furthermore, these lobster eggs are carried (by being attached to the tail by something that resembles glue) for almost one whole year. Despite their production of thousands of eggs, only about one percent actually live to be adults.

About the female lobster: Fact #4

If you notice a clump of red balls that are located on the inside of the lobster tail you are actually holding a “pregnant” lobster. These balls are immature eggs that have yet to be released to being hidden under the tail. This is where the above caviar is retrieved for human consumption.

About the female lobster: Fact #5

These female lobsters are also known as hens. Furthermore, she is only able to mate after she sheds her exterior shell, which is also frequently known as molting. From here she actually makes the first move and goes toward the male den, making the female lobster proactive in the mating process. She is the one who picks her mate, not the other way around.

As you can see, these female lobsters appear to have zero additions in terms of flavoring or amount of meat within the lobster tail when it comes to culinary purposes; however, anyone wishing to partake in lobster caviar will definitely be more interested in female lobsters than the male version. Despite their similarities in the kitchen, these female lobsters are very distinct within their natural habitat. Female lobsters seek out their mates and take their “pick of the litter.” These hens (female lobsters) are therefore very proactive in the lobster arena and have around ten thousand immature eggs at one time but only produces about one percent of those into the adult population. Now you know all you need to know about the female lobster!

 

 

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